Polishing a Delicate Wire Link Necklace in a Rotary Tumbler

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The delicate necklace shown here was so badly tarnished that I decided that the best way to restore its original luster and silver color would be to polish it in a Rotary Tumbler just like I did when I first made it. Tumbling in a rotary tumbler burnishes the metal’s surface and results in a brilliant luster.

Tumbling the necklace in a rotary tumbler filled with steel shot will not only polish the necklace, but also contribute to “work harden” the individual wire links that form the necklace. But to successfully polish a chain-link necklace in a rotary tumbler, precautions must be taken to prevent the necklace from becoming a tangled mess.

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This image shows the type of stainless steel shot that I use together with 910 Tumbling Soap Powder.

 

The following are my recommendations for successfully polishing wire link necklaces in a rotary tumbler:

1. Construct a hoop that is sized to fit into the tumbler using very heavy weed wacker nylon cord or similar material.

2. Flatten sections of the cord by tightly squeezing it with chain-link pliers, and drill a tiny hole through these flattened sections. The drilled holes become anchor points where the chain-link necklace can be fastened to the plastic hoop. I use lightweight fishing line to secure the necklace to the anchor points drilled into the plastic hoop.

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This image shows a delicate necklace attached to an improvised plastic hoop fashioned from nylon  weed wacker cord. This necklace is tied at three points. The tiny holes serve as anchor points, and tying the necklace to these points prevents movement and entanglements during the tumbling action.

 

 

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A detailed view showing the tiny hole that I drilled into a flattened section of the nylon cord. The red arrow indicates where I drilled the hole.

 

 

 

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To make the improvised plastic hoop fashioned from nylon weed wacker cord, I secured the ends of the nylon cord together with “cable ties” that I purchased at Home Depot. The insert shows a piece of blue wire passing through the tiny hole (“anchor point”)  that is drilled into the cord. 

 

 

  • Overlap the nylon cord by at least 2″ then secure it tightly using 2 heavy duty “cable ties.”
  • Trim off the excess plastic from the cable ties after it is pulled as tightly as possible to the nylon cord that forms the hoop.

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The ends of the nylon cord held tightly in place with plastic cable ties.

 

 

 

To polish a wire link necklace, tumble it for approximately one hour.

 A word of caution, the mechanical action of a rotary tumbler does remove a very small amount of the metal therefore I do not recommend frequent use of this method to polish wire link necklaces.

 

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More videos you might like:

Dangling Heart Shaped Earrings Hearts
Wire Earrings With Multiple Spirals multiple spirals
The Lotus/ Miniature Watercolor MiniWCPainting

 

Posted in Link necklaces, Necklaces, Tools and supplies, Wire jewelry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Egyptian Link with Beads – Updated Method

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Sometime ago I posted a blog article on “How to Add Beads to the Classic Egyptian Link.” This method involved adding the bead to the link after the link was formed. Recently I have changed my method and now add the bead before forming the spirals that are the dominant characteristic of the Egyptian Link.

This approach for incorporating beads achieves much better results, and it is the most effective way to include beads within this classic link.

Step 1

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Cut six inch lengths of 20 gauge dead soft wire (metal of your choice) to form each individual link. Make sure that the measurements are exact.

 

 

Step 2

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Fold the 6″ inch lengths of wire in half.

Step 3

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After folding the wire exactly in half, hold the wire firmly with round nose pliers and crimp the wire to form the top loop.

Step 4

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This step introduces the 90° curve below the loop that was just formed. To do this position the pliers at the base of the loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 5

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Bend the wire at a 90° angle as illustrated in the photo. This bend is not a sharp angle; it is a gently shaped 90° curve.

Step 6a

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This step will prepare the wire for the addition of the bead. Holding the end of the wire with round nose pliers, position the wire at approximately the 1/8″ inch width on the pliers. Bend the wire to form a half circle.

Step 6b

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When the half circle is made, the wire should be pointing up.

 

 

 

Step 7

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Position a bead on the end of the wire, and begin to spiral around the bead with chain-link or curved nose pliers.

Step 8

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Turn the wire up around the bead until the newly formed spiral is approximately 1/2″ inch from the top of the loop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This method of wrapping wire around a small glass bead will successfully integrate the bead into the Egyptian link.

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See Part 1 of my original video series for instructions on How to Make the Egyptian Link Necklace.

Stay tuned for an upcoming video in which I’ll demonstrate my all new link necklace!

 

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More videos you might like:

Earrings Based on Spiral & Figure 8  
Egyptian Link Earrings  
Silver Earrings with Spiral and Coil  
Spiral Hoop Necklace & Purple Beads  
Heart Link Necklace  

 The jewelry objects that you see created in the videos and websites are original designs by Ross Barbera. These designs may be copied for your personal use only, and may not be offered for sale or exhibition without written permission from Ross Barbera.

©2013 Ross Barbera Realisticart, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Basic wire construction, Beads, Link necklaces, Necklaces, Wire jewelry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Creating Jewelry Objects Composed with Concentric Rectangles

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The two pairs of earrings on the right side show rice paper beads framed within a series of concentric rectangular forms, and the pair of earrings on the left represents small watercolor on paper paintings framed by concentric rectangular forms.

When using beads, I usually restrict my bead selection to handmade paper beads, although sometimes I do incorporate purchased beads.  The inclusion of beads represents a way to accent and create textural contrasts within the jewelry object. The primary reason why I prefer using my own handmade paper beads as opposed to using purchased beads is that my handmade beads give me complete control over their shape and color.

Approaching jewelry design as sculpture-in-miniature, I apply the same compositional considerations to jewelry design as I do in painting. I strive to create jewelry objects that are resolved visual statements, harmoniously integrating form, color and texture.  Another reason why I like using my handmade paper beads as opposed to introducing purchased beads is this: purchased beads can be extremely beautiful, but I find their beauty to be a distraction from the compositional integrity of my jewelry. The addition of handmade paper beads enables me to maintain a unified look throughout the piece. All of the parts that make up the jewelry object – although they may have contrasting textures and colors – embody a unique and distinctive visual signature. Each handcrafted part contributes to the jewelry object, like individual brushstrokes contribute to the totality of a painting.

Let’s examine an effective way for making a beautifully simple earring form composed of concentric squares.

The rectangle is a powerfully elegant and simple shape that I often use in my jewelry designs.  The challenge when forming concentric rectangles is to create shapes that maintain 90° corners and parallel sides.  The following will show how I achieve nicely formed right angles at the corner of each rectangle.

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Step 1

1.  Cut two lengths of 18 gauge dead soft wire, 11 inches long.  Next make the first bend by measuring 1/2 inch from the end of the wire, and at that point bend a 90° angle.

 

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Step 2

2.  Position your pliers at 1/8 inch from the first 90° bend, to make a second 90° bend. Bend the wire parallel to the 1/2 inch length of wire that was previously bent.

 

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Step 3

3.  In this step I make certain that the 90° corners are firmly locked in place. To do this, position the wire on a steel block and hammer the bent wire corners with a chasing hammer.  Before hammering, double check to make sure the wire is bent to 90°, then hammer the 90° corners.  This effectively work hardens the wire, giving it a flattened forged look, locking the 90° angle in place.

 

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Step 4

 

 

4.  To ensure that the 1/2″ length of wire is centered within the earring, instead of measuring 1/8″ inch from the right angle, I position my pliers at the 1/4″ inch mark, and make the next 90° bend.

The 1/2″ center wire will eventually hold the bead.

 

 

 

Step 5

Step 5

5.  The pliers are positioned to make the next 90° bend. This bend completes the first rectangular shape. After the bend is formed, I carefully hammer the new corner to work harden and flatten the wire, making sure that all the opposite sides of the rectangle that are being formed are reasonably parallel to one another.

*see the next image

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View of the 1st complete rectangle. This rectangle will be used as a guide to complete the remaining rectangles. It takes a total of 5 bends to arrive at this stage. 

 

 

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Step 6

6.  The fifth bend will result in the completion of the first rectangular shape.  To make this bend, I line up my pliers along the base of the inner rectangular shape; next I introduce a 90° bend that is perpendicular to the wire form, as shown in the image at the left.

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Step 7

7.  After the perpendicular bend that you see in Step 6 is made, I re-bend the wire to the correct position, and hammer the newly formed corner before moving on to the next bend.

I repeat this procedure for making each 90° bend, and I forge all newly bent corners before moving on to the next bend.  This method results in rectangular shapes with square corners and parallel lines.

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An example of the finished earring with concentric rectangular forms, before the rice paper bead is attached.

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Sterling Silver, Square Link Necklace by Ross Barbera

In the necklace that is show above, I created all the 90° angles for each square shape first, then hammered the completed square forms on each individual link with a chasing hammer. I held off on forging the square forms on a steel block until all the angles were bent; then hammered the completed square shape – this results in slight variations in the corner angles. I approached the links for this necklace in this way because I intended to achieve a slightly irregular look in each square shape.

COMING SOON –  My video tutorial demonstrating the concentric rectangle jewelry object in detail!

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More videos you might like:

     Bead Locked Earrings  
     Greek Link Earrings  
     The Greek Link Necklace  
     The S- Link Necklace with Beads  

 The jewelry objects that you see created in the videos and websites are original designs by Ross Barbera. These designs may be copied for your personal use only, and may not be offered for sale or exhibition without written permission from Ross Barbera.

©2013 Ross Barbera Realisticart, Inc.

 

Posted in Basic wire construction, Link necklaces, Necklaces, Other Paper Solutions, Pendants, Watercolor jewelry, Wire and Watercolor Paper Jewelry, Wire earrings, Wire jewelry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Bridging Links: Combining Beads and Watercolor Paper Shapes into Unit Form Constructions

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The necklace shown here is an example of a “Unit Form” watercolor paper necklace in which the individual unit forms are linked together using a bridging link. Both end loops of the bridging link are locked closed with tightly wrapped coils.  This type of linking mechanism is very secure and results in a necklace with great flexibility.

I refer to this type of necklace as a “Unit Form” necklace because it is composed of identical, repeated shapes.

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Closed bridging link

The bridging link is made from 20 gauge, sterling silver wire, and both ends are resolved with coils that tie the loop closed. The bridging links are formed from lengths of wire measuring 3.5″ / 8.9 cm.

Open bridging link

Example of a bridging link with a jump ring style loop

This type of bridging link (right) with unlocked loops can also be used, but I prefer the coil locked loop (above) to the jump ring style loop because the locked loops are 100% secure.

They will not accidentally open.

First create a locked-end loop

First step: creating a locked-end loop

In the necklace illustrated at the top of this page,  the bridging link serves two purposes:

  1. It unites the rice paper beads with the circular watercolor paper forms
  2. It attaches these assemblages together to form the necklace.

To attach the bridging link to the rice paper beads and unit form, first create a locked end loop as illustrated in the example above.

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Then slide the watercolor paper unit form and the rice paper bead onto the partially formed bridging link.

Completing the unit form assemblage

Completing the unit form assemblage

Complete the “unit form” assemblage of (1) wire, (2) circular paper form and (3) rice paper bead by wrapping the remaining straight end of wire into a coil locked loop.

Preparing to attach the next assemblage

Preparing to attach the next assemblage

To attach the next assemblage of wire and paper, the first step is to form a locked coil on one end of a pre-cut length of wire. Then, position the unit form and rice paper bead onto the unfinished bridging link and form the end loop.

 

 

 

Sliding the open loop onto a completed loop

Sliding the open loop into a completed loop

After the remaining loop has been formed, but not locked in place with a coil, slide the open loop onto the loop of the completed  assemblage, then lock it in place by coiling the wire’s end around the shaft of  the bridging link.

Connected unit form assemblages

 

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Above is a sterling silver wire construction with beads. This is another example that employs the bridging link with the coil locked loop.

Both necklaces seen in this post will be available as detailed video demonstrations during this summer.

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More videos you might like:

     The Greek Link Necklace   
     The S- Link Necklace with Beads   

 

     Arc w/Rice Paper Cylinder Earrings
     Making Rice Paper Earrings

 The jewelry objects that you see created in the videos and websites are original designs by Ross Barbera. These designs may be copied for your personal use only, and may not be offered for sale or exhibition without written permission from Ross Barbera.

©2013 Ross Barbera Realisticart, Inc.

 

 

 

Posted in Basic watercolor jewelry construction, Beads, Link necklaces, Necklaces, Other Paper Solutions, Rice Paper Jewelry, Watercolor jewelry, Wire and Watercolor Paper Jewelry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Creating an Adjustable Length Necklace

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Example of traditional sliding knot

Example of traditional sliding knot

The image on the right illustrates a traditional sliding knot clasp. When using a sliding knot,  I like to resolve the ends of the cord with beads.

The sliding knot clasp is one of the most efficient and economical methods for resolving the ends of the cord on which a pendant is hung. The sliding knot eliminates the need to use a 2-part clasp.

Sliding knot clasp with watercolor paper beads

Sliding knot clasp with watercolor paper beads

On this Watercolor Paper Necklace, the sliding knots have been replaced with watercolor paper beads.

Construct the watercolor paper beads using the same process used to construct Watercolor Paper Pendants; the beads are attached to the ends of the cord in the areas where the knots would normally be tied.

These handmade paper beads incorporate channels just wide enough to permit the  hanging cord to pass through. Replacing actual knots with paper beads allows complementary design elements to be designed into the necklace that effectively unite the pendant and hanging cord into a visually unified work of art. Complete control over the design process is achieved. The sliding beads (I sometimes refer to them as unit forms) can be shaped and painted to complement the pendant. In addition to providing a means for adjusting the pendant’s hanging length, they function as beautiful decorative elements.

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The key to accomplishing this adjustability is in the design of the two sliding unit forms that lock the cord’s ends in place. Each unit form locks one end of the cord in place while permitting the opposite end to pass through and slide freely. The length that passes completely through a form also passes through the opposite form and is locked in place with a wooden bead glued to the cord’s end. It is this combination of the cord passing completely through a unit form (a watercolor paper bead) and locking into the opposite unit form that results in a mechanism that is adjustable.

Round punches

Round paper punches speed up the construction process

An efficient method for creating small watercolor paper beads that can be used in place of sliding knots is to use paper punches. Paper punches  are available in a variety shapes, and can significantly speed up the construction process by eliminating the need to cut out the individual paper shapes that are glued together to create the small, sliding forms. The image shows the round punches that I used to create the round sliding forms on two of the pendants illustrated in this post.

Sliding knot clasp with heart shapes

Sliding knot clasp with heart shapes and flat cord

For the heart shapes, I cut the individual paper layers out by hand. Preferring the look of “stylized” hearts, I decided not to use available paper punches. Commercially available  punches would result in more generic heart shapes.

These beautiful, simple hearts, locked in place by the wooden beads glued to the ends of the cord, form an adjustable mechanism that works very well with flat, suede cord. The cord’s flatness is ideal for passing through the channel in these small shapes.  Round cord can also be used.

The cord's length can be adjusted

The cord’s length can be adjusted to permit the pendant to fall relatively high

When the cord’s length is adjusted to permit the pendant to fall relatively high, this moves the beads from the back to the front and results in wonderful design interaction between the pendant and watercolor paper beads.

Soon I will be releasing a detailed video demonstrating the construction of this type of adjustable mechanism.

 

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More videos you might like:

Watercolor Paper Bracelet – Part 1
Watercolor Paper Bracelet – Part 2
Bracelet with Watercolor Paper & Wire
Making Watercolor Paper Earrings
The Basic Earwire
Constructing Basic Eye Pin

The jewelry objects that you see created in the videos and websites are original designs by Ross Barbera. These designs may be copied for your personal use only, and may not be offered for sale or exhibition without written permission from Ross Barbera.

©2013 Ross Barbera Realisticart, Inc.

Posted in Basic watercolor jewelry construction, Necklaces, Other Paper Solutions, Pendants, Watercolor jewelry, Watercolor Jewelry Findings | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Watercolor Paper Pendant: Creating a Flat Channel Without Wax

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The Watercolor Paper Pendant that you see illustrated in the photograph floats on a cord that passes through a channel built into the piece.

A channel is a beautifully functional way to mount a pendant, and is my preferred method for making pendants wearable. The channel eliminates the need for additional hanging hardware such as jump rings or eye pins, and results in the jewelry object’s design not being altered with additional hardware attachments.

If you haven’t already done so, please watch my 3-part video series on “How to Construct the Watercolor Paper Pendant.”

During the early summer I will be releasing a new Watercolor Paper Pendant video that includes the non-wax method of channel construction that I discuss in this blog article. Many of you have requested a non-wax approach, as well as instructions for creating a flat-backed channel. This post covers both, as will my coming video.

For the past few years I have used a “lost wax process,” to create the channel. This method employs a wax string that is eventually melted out to form the channel into which the cord passes through. In this article I will discuss a new method that I recently developed for constructing the channel. This method eliminates the use of wax which can be problematic, and is very effective for creating a flat, hidden channel that passes through the piece.

Having developed the pendant’s design, the first step in building the The Watercolor Paper Pendant is to prepare the paper layers.

8 cut layers of 140 lb.,cold pressed watercolor paper

8 cut layers of 140 lb.,cold pressed watercolor paper

The photo on the right shows 8 layers of 140lb, cold pressed watercolor paper that have been cut into the shape of the final design. All layers will be glued together to form the pendant. Note how the 4 layers in the top of the photo have been cut to accommodate the channel.

 

Applying glue to the first layer of paper

Applying glue to the first layer of paper

 

Using a plastic dispenser bottle, I apply glue to the first layer of paper. After the glue has been evenly spread, I position the second, solid layer of watercolor paper.

Recommended Glue:
Lineco, Neutral pH Adhesive

 

 

With the second layer of paper in place, apply a thick layer of  glue, and spread it evenly with a brush.

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On top of the two solid layers of paper that have been glued together,  position the cut layers. The gluing of the cut layers establishes the channel formation.

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The channel is four paper layers thick. This thickness is necessary and permits the jewelry cord to pass through the finished piece. It is very important to remove all excess glue, and the photograph below shows me scraping excess glue from the channel.

Removing excess glue from the channel

Removing excess glue from the channel

 

It is very important to keep glue away from the channel!

It is very important to keep glue away from the channel!

 

With the four channel layers glued in place, I carefully apply glue to the top layer.

It is important to keep the channel free of glue!

 

 

 

Before gluing the two remaining, top, solid layers of paper that will complete the pendant, insert a length of 3/32″ Teflon Valve Packing into the channel that was created in the previous step. This cord like Teflon material is perfect for keeping the channel open when gluing the final two top solid layers of paper in place.

no_wax83/32″ Teflon Valve Packing is available at any hardware store, and packaged in 36″ lengths.

 

 

 

 

The photograph below shows the final two top layers of paper glued in place. Make sure that the Teflon extends at least 1/2″ beyond the pendant on both sides. The Teflon replaces the wax that I used in the original method to construct the channel.

Teflon extends 1/2" beyond the edge of the pendant on both sides

Teflon extends 1/2″ beyond the edge of the pendant on both sides

With all paper layers glued in place, I position the pendant on a curved surface and burnish it with a wooden dowel. Applying light pressure as I rub the entire surface with a dowel assures that the layers will be firmly glued together. This is an important step. Examine the piece carefully as you burnish it to assure that no paper layers are separating. If separation is occurring, apply extra pressure to that area until the glue grabs.

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This old globe that I found in my basement is perfect for giving the pendant a slightly curved shape. I use it in forming almost all my Watercolor Paper Pendants and Earrings.

An old globe is perfect for creating a slightly curved shape

An old globe is perfect for creating a slightly curved shape

While the piece is still slightly damp, I  slide out the 3/32″ Teflon Valve Packing, and inset a  length of Round String Trimmer Line, .095″ thick. Replacing the soft Teflon Valve Packing with the stiffer Trimmer Line will enable you to keep the channel clean by repeatedly working it through the pendant during the final stages.

Trimmer Line is  available at most hardware stores or garden centers. Trimmer line is used in weed wackers.

Replace the Teflon with Trimmer Line to keep the channel clean

Replace the Teflon with Trimmer Line to keep the channel clean

The final steps are:

  • Glue the top, painted layer of paper.
  • Glue the decorative, back paper layer. For this I use banana paper.
  • Clean up the edges by filing and sanding.
  • Varnish the pendant
  • Heat in a toaster oven at 150 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes to harden the varnish.
Back View: a pendant floats on its cord

Back View: a pendant with inserted bead floats on its cord

Watch my 3-part video series on “How to Construct the Watercolor Paper Pendant.”  It provides detailed, step-by-step instructions for the entire construction process. My new video demonstrating the non-wax method will be released early this summer.

One final note, when you are finished working with the Trimmer Line and Teflon Packing, soak them in water to clean off the glue, and this material can be reused in your next pendant project.

Subscribe to my Newsletter! Sign-up box is on the upper right side of this page — >

More You Tube videos you might like:

    Watercolor Paper Pendant – Part 1
    Watercolor Paper Pendant – Part 2
    Watercolor Paper Pendant – Part 3
    Channel for Pendant – Part 1
    Channel for Pendant – Part 2
    Watercolor Paper Bracelet – Part 1
    Watercolor Paper Bracelet – Part 2

The jewelry objects that you see created in the videos and websites are original designs by Ross Barbera. These designs may be copied for your personal use only, and may not be offered for sale or exhibition without written permission from Ross Barbera.

©2013 Ross Barbera Realisticart, Inc.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Basic watercolor jewelry construction, Pendants, Watercolor jewelry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Watercolor Paints – My Basic Color Palette for Watercolor Paper Jewelry & Painting

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I receive many questions regarding the colors that I use for my watercolor paper jewelry and watercolor painting. In this article I will discuss the basic color palette that I employ for both jewelry and paintings.

Over the many years that I have been painting, my palette has evolved, and the amount individual tubes of colors that I use has become smaller and smaller. Even though I have always understood the need for mixing colors rather than using paints straight out of their tubes, in my early days of serious painting (early 1970’s), I would purchase almost every tube of color available. But over time I eliminated colors, and my palette gradually evolved into a spectrum of primary colors that I mix to achieve what seems to be an unlimited range of color possibilities. Gradually eliminating all secondary and tertiary tube colors, I relied exclusively on mixing primary colors to achieve all the colors that you see in my paintings and jewelry. Even most of my browns and blacks are mixed from primary colors, and, yes, there can be many rich variations on black!

Successful color mixing requires more than just using the three primary colors: Red, Yellow & Blue. Although using just the three primary colors that are as close as possible to the the spectrum primaries -in theory- should work, it does not in a practical sense. To create my watercolor painting and jewelry, I use Winsor & Newton paints exclusively, and I consider Winsor Red, Winsor Yellow and Cobalt Blue to be very close to spectrum colors. If I use these alone, however, they are not enough for me to mix all the colors that I need. By employing a variety of Reds, Yellows and Blues, l can mix any color seen in nature. Technological advancements in the formulation of modern pigments has made  many variations on primary colors available to artists.

For example, Red is a primary color, and the color red cannot be mixed by combining two different colors. What red does one purchase to use in color mixing?  There are a few reds available with very different color properties.  I recommend purchasing a range of reds. The different color properties of the reds available as tubed pigments result in great flexibility in color mixing.

The same principle that applies to red is also true for Blue. As a primary color, I keep a variety of blues on my palette – all with uniquely different color properties. The same approach also applies to Yellow, and the yellows that I most often use are Winsor Yellow and Aureolin Yellow.

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A good example of the advantages in using different blues can be seen in mixing greens. The color chart above indicates a small range of greens possible just by mixing Winsor Yellow with different blues.

The following color chart shows the colors that I use most frequently.

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1. Winsor Yellow   2. Aureolin Yellow   3. Winsor Red   4. Permanent Rose

5. Scarlet Lake     6. Alizarin Crimson    7. Quinacridone Magenta

8. Winsor Blue    9. Cobalt Blue    10. French Ultramarine Blue

11. Cerulean Blue    12. Antwerp Blue   13. Quinacridone Gold

14. Burnt Sienna    15. Brown Madder

16. Mixed Green: Winsor Yellow + Cobalt Blue

17. Mixed Green: Winsor Yellow + Antwerp Blue

18. Neutral Tint   19. Mixed Gray: Antwerp Blue + Brown Madder

———————————————————-

The greens that you see in the color chart are mixed greens.  I never use premixed, tube greens. They are almost always too “chemical looking” for my work. #16 on the chart represents a combination of  Winsor Yellow + Cobalt Blue, and #17 results from a combination of Winsor Yellow + Antwerp Blue.

I also use primary colors to mix most of my browns and grays, and, additionally, I do use Burnt Sienna and Brown Madder in my palette of colors. For gray, I use Neutral Tint and Paynes Gray, but also rely on mixing for most grays. In the chart above, #19 is a Mixed Gray resulting from Antwerp Blue + Brown Madder. Another very useful color you might want to add to your palette is Quinacridone Gold.

In  summary, although my primary palette consists of Red, Yellow and Blue,  each individual primary color is represented by a range of variations.

More coming …

I will be posting a series of articles about color mixing and working with watercolors as they apply to the creation of both jewelry and painting.

 

Watercolor Painting DVD Now Available!  

(click for info)

Subscribe to my Newsletter! Sign-up box is on the upper right side of this page — >

 

More You Tube videos you might like:

Watercolor Paper Bracelet – Part 1
Watercolor Paper Bracelet – Part 2

The jewelry objects that you see created in these videos are original designs by Ross Barbera. These designs may be copied for your personal use only, and may not be offered for sale or exhibition without written permission from Ross Barbera.

©2013 Ross Barbera Realisticart, Inc.

Posted in Basic watercolor jewelry construction, Pendants, Rice Paper Jewelry, Watercolor bracelets, Watercolor earrings, Watercolor jewelry, Watercolor painting, Wire and Watercolor Paper Jewelry | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments